Early 2000s rappers

This holiday season, consider giving the gift of positive support in the form of a donation to one of these ten important music-related community charities.

When I first discovered there was such a thing as “Music For Dogs,” I was kind of shocked I hadn’t come across it sooner. I mean, there is now music and playlists to accompany everything, so of course there’d be one for our favorite four-legged fur-balls (sorry cat lovers). Well, Mr. Puppy was in for a treat because over the next week I’d go on to try an array of made-for-dogs style playlists.

Since the housing bubble burst in 2008, banks are skittish about lending money to nontraditional earners like songwriters, here’s how you can beat them.

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Well, you’re going to need a tuner pedal; all that hard, consistent strumming is bound to detune some of your strings after every couple of songs! Tuning by ear is pretty tough in club gigs, so it’s always handy to have a direct-signal going into your chain. Almost every guitarist I know uses the Boss TU-3, but the Korg PB01 works just as well and is cheaper! Boss and Korg are household brands. We’re just talking about a tuner pedal here, it doesn’t need to be high end. My trick is to put my tuner at the end of my effects chain, so I can mute all of my FX noise abruptly just by stepping on it once. It’s a lot of fun with powerful climactic endings.

This is a silly one, but look at local movie theaters — usually they offer specials once a week (Tuesday is often a cheaper day of the week) and it’s a nice distraction from the van, the stage, etc. It’s fun to lose yourself in a movie and turn off your phone for a few hours.

If you’re ready to get started, tell us about yourself. If you want to know more, just head over to the Headliners Club info page or feel free get in touch with us via email.

Soundfly welcomes new voices each month to offer unique perspectives, shine a light on unexpected musical worlds, and help our readers find their sound.

From the influential mid-century Czech composer Bohuslav Martinů, we have his Fantasia for theremin, oboe, string quartet, and piano. Composed in the summer of 1944 and premiered the next year in New York, this work may not be one of Martinů’s better-known pieces; but, nevertheless, it’s exciting to see a composer exploring a new and exciting instrument so late in their career. With the microtonal possibilities of this instrument, the entire tonal spectrum is your oyster, and Martinů’s off-kilter expressive notation really brings out the depth of beauty and unrest that this instrument is capable of producing.

90s rap artists

Carter Lee is a bassist/educator/producer. He is originally from Edmonton, Canada and now resides in Brooklyn, NY. In addition to leading the hip-hop group, Tiger Speak, Lee is the music director for the bands of both Shea Rose and Moruf. He is also a sideman for countless other artists. Carter brings his wealth of experience in many different musical situations to the Soundfly team and is eager to help any musician who is hoping to better their band. Check out his course Building a Better Band on Soundfly today!

My sister is a TV comedy writer, and she once told me all she wants to do when she gets home is watch CSI or some other dark, dramatic show — because all she does all day is write jokes! I’ve noticed a similar pattern (have you?). When I’m done with a long string of shows, all I want to do is listen to nothing. But I found a loophole for this: Listen to the stuff you listened to as a teenager or when you first started getting into music. For me that’s ’90s R&B and neo-soul. Give me Ms. Lauryn Hill or Destiny’s Child and I’m instantly transported to a happy place, where I can dance around like a dummy and not care about anything.

Founded in 1939, BMI is the largest PRO in the US, and represents over 900,000 songwriters, composers and publishers. The organization distributed $1.023 billion in 2017.

Eventually, the bass line drops down an octave and changes its stubborn pedaling to play chord tones along with the rest of the rhythm section. It starts with the same old D and A. Next, it moves to C♯ and A for the A chord. Then it moves to the B chord but still keeps the pressure on with that non-chord-tone A. Finally, it rounds off with a pleasant, resolute walk-up, bouncing back up between notes of the major scale and A, which is the root of the chord. Classic!

I mostly approached this as “soloing” with the a cappella, using the instrumental as my “rhythm section.” But I did some improvising with the instrumental too, by looping, and by jumping around between cue points. I don’t consider this to be a polished work of art or anything, but I discovered some pretty cool sounds, even at my basic skill level. So I’m excited to see where this leads.